Tuesday, June 19, 2018

The Use of purposeful communication

Increase communication among all teams by utilizing purposeful communication. Confronting issues and providing feedback is a form of purposeful communication. Purposeful communication is when a team member uses sensitivity and forethought when communicating a clear and concise message with a soothing tone that maintains a positive relationship for both parties involved (Cox, 2014; Wilson Learning Worldwide, 2007; & Singleton et al., 2011). Purposeful communication is communicating with tact and getting the point across without aggression and rudeness.

Cox, A. (2014). Increasing Purposeful Communication in the Workplace: Two School-District

Models. Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin, 80(3), 34-38.

Singleton, R., Toombs, L. A., Taneja, S., Larkin, C., & Pryor, M. G. (2011). Workplace conflict:

A strategic leadership imperative. International Journal of Business & Public

Administration, 8(1), 149-163

Wilson Learning Worldwide. (2007). Individual effectiveness: Creating the effective workforce.

Edina, MN.

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Reducing workplace conflict

Reduce workplace conflict by creating a conflict management strategy/program. Conflict management involves a wide range of activities which include communication, problem-solving, dealing with emotions, and understanding the roles/positions teammates have (Behfar, Mannix, Peterson, & Trochim, 2008). Creating a conflict management strategy/program will allow a safe place for employees to learn responsibility for their actions and how to handle them. How are you handling conflict management in your organization? Do you have a conflict management strategy/program?

Behfar, K., Peterson, R. Mannix, E, & Trochim, W. (2008). The critical role of conflict

resolution in teams: A close look at the links between conflict type, conflict management

strategies, and team outcomes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 93(1): 170-188.

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

What is conflict?

Conflict has many definitions. Conflict is can be known as a misunderstanding, disagreement, argument, an interruption in schedule, or a mental struggle to understand another’s point of view. Merriam Webster defines conflict as a competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). Conflict cannot be avoided and they ARE going to happen. Over the next three weeks, we will explore some strategies to of how to handle conflict in the workplace.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conflict

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Leadership in the organization

The GLOBE Project (House et al., 2004) study focused on areas of an individual’s intrinsic views of self. Leaders as well as their followers are individuals and possess different leadership styles. The GLOBE study mentions six: charismatic or value-based, team-oriented, participative, autonomous, humane-oriented, and self-protecting leadership (Erez, 2011). Each dimension can be used during different scenarios in the leadership role. Applying each dimension aids in the creation of the organization’s culture. Are you using these leadership styles in your organization to build the culture?

Erez, M. (2011). Cross-cultural and global issues in organizational psychology. In S. Bedeck, S. 

Bedeck (Eds.), APA handbook of industrial and organizational psychology, Vol 3: 

Maintaining, expanding, and contracting the organization (pp. 807-854). Washington, 

DC, US: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/12171-023

House, R. J., Hangs, P. W., Jividen, M., Dorman, P., & Gupta, V. (Eds.). (2004). Culture,
leadership, and organizations: The GLOBE study of 62 societies. Thousand Oaks, CA: 
Sage.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Teamwork Development- Part Two

Teams are developed by cultural tactics. Glisson & James (2002), states the attitudes of the team members is 86% of reasoning behind turnovers. This same statement can be interpreted as people don’t leave companies, they leave people and many times those are people on the team they belonged to. Breakthrough research from (Erez, 2011) states, team development depends on team interdependence which determines how much team members can and will depend on each other. Teams who depend on each other show signs of trust. If the trust is built the team bond and cohesiveness will be stronger.
Erez, M. (2011). Cross-cultural and global issues in organizational psychology. In S. Bedeck, S. 

Bedeck (Eds.), APA handbook of industrial and organizational psychology, Vol 3: 

Maintaining, expanding, and contracting the organization (pp. 807-854). Washington, 

DC, US: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/12171-023

Glisson, C., & James, L. R. (2002). The cross-level effects of culture and climate in human 
service teams. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 23, 767–794. doi:10.1002/ job.162

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Teamwork Development- Part One

 Teams have been in existence for centuries. The varieties of teams can range from sports teams to workplace teams, therefore, team development tactics and methods are not new and major breakthroughs have been made. McGrath (1984) discovered that applying task characteristics within the team will aid in the development of a dynamic and diverse team. As teams are developed they should be thought of as small cities. They are dynamic societies that will change with time (Salas, Kozlowski, & Chen, 2017). Another break though for team development is the usage of time. Teams will evolve and mature as changes start to arise. As leadership changes, so will the team dynamic. The study of time and cultural differences are essential if we must understand team development (Salas, Kozlowski, & Chen, 2017; Gland, Ere, Aydan, & Leung, 2017).

Gland, M. J., Aydan, Z., Ere, M., & Leung, K. (2017). Cross-cultural industrial organizational 

psychology and organizational behavior: A hundred-year journey. Journal of Applied 

Psychology, 102(3), 514-529. doi:10.1037/apl0000186

McGrath, J. E. (1984). Groups: Interaction and performance. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice 
Hall. 
Salas, E., Kozlowski, S. J., & Chen, G. (2017). A century of progress in industrial and 

organizational psychology: Discoveries and the next century. Journal of Applied 

Psychology, 102(3), 589-598. doi:10.1037/apl0000206

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Workplace Motivation Part Two: Job Design


Job design has much to do with motivation on the job as it refers to the job functions, tasks, expectations, and responsibilities of the position held which can aid in employee engagement and employee engagement. Job enrichment models define job motivation potential in terms of the opportunities the job provides to the employee on a psychological level (Erez, 2011). Job design also must do with the relational aspect of the of the positions held. Relational aspects can include working in groups and teams, feedback, and personal gains and achievements. Grant (2007) in his studies stated that adding a relational aspect to positions could enhance the motivational potential of the job and increase its meaningfulness. The mentioned studies show that goal setting and job design have a major role if an employee will be engaged in their work and if they will be motivated. 


Erez, M. (2011). Cross-cultural and global issues in organizational psychology. In S. Bedeck, S. 

Bedeck (Eds.), APA handbook of industrial and organizational psychology, Vol 3: 

Maintaining, expanding, and contracting the organization (pp. 807-854). Washington, 

DC, US: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/12171-023

Grant, A. M. (2007). Relational job design and the motivation to make a prosocial difference. 
Academy of Management Review, 32, 393–417.