Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Working with multiple generations in the workplace: Generation X

Gen Xers is another name for the Generation X. This generation was born between 1965-1980 (Wiedmer, 2015). Gen Xers may be viewed as a little pampered as many of them gave birth to the next generation to be discussed, Generation Y/Millennials. This generation had to learn to be independent because their parents (Baby Boomers) were always working, therefore this generation can also be considered strong-willed. The Gen Xers survived major events that influenced their cultural and societal views such as the Women’s Liberation Movement, the rise of the first personal computer, AIDS, The Challenger disaster, the Fall of the berlin Wall, and the Rodney King beating (Clark, 2017). Gen Xers represent 34% or 52.7 million of the workforce today (Fry, 2015). The Gen Xers are self-taught individuals who do not want nor need much guidance and do not want to be micromanaged. Gen Xers need to be able to set their own schedule and they can be trusted to adhere to it. Because of their independent upbringing Gen Xers aren’t going to work long hours for status and more money; they cherish and take pride in creating their work/life balance (Wiedmer, 2015). Gen Xers want to travel and explore the world, take their children to see different cultures, and create experiences. Gen Xers will report less enthusiasm to work overtime than Baby Boomers and Generation Y (Clark, 2017). Gen Xers are also very independent. They want to be considered and seen as self-reliant, multi-taskers, flexible, and more open-minded than Baby Boomers (Wiedmer, 2015). Gen Xers also like to gain new skills to better market themselves, therefore they are less loyal to their employer and more loyal to accomplishing their final goal in life. They desire to build portable careers by exploring multiple employment opportunities and changing jobs periodically (Wiedmer, 2015). Organizations need Gen Xers to keep them on their toes.


Clark, K. R. (2017). Managing Multiple Generations in the Workplace. Radiologic            Technology88(4), 379-398
Fry R. (2015).  Millennials surpass Gen Xers as the largest generation in U.S. labor force. Pew
Research Center website. http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/05/11/ millennials-surpass-gen-xers-as-the-largest-generation-in- u-s-labor-force. Published May 11, 2015
Wiedmer T. (2015). Generations do differ: best practices in leading traditionalists, boomers, and

generations X, Y, and Z. Delta Kappa Gamma Bull. 2015;82(1):51-58

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Working with multiple generations in the workplace: Baby Boomers

Baby Boomers were born between 1946 and 1964 and are categorized into two groups, the early boomers, born between 1946 and 1955 and the late boomers born after 1955 (Wiedmer, 2015). Baby Boomers are a highly regarded and discussed generation because many of them are preparing for retirement leaving many vacant job positions available. The Baby Boomer generation survived major events that influenced their cultural and societal views such as the Civil Rights Movement, many political assassinations such as Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, Neil Armstrong’s landing on the moon, Woodstock, and the great movement of television becoming a major phenomenon (Clark, 2017). The Baby Boomer generation is very strong-willed and were afforded the opportunity to attend college. While Baby Boomers attended college, they were exposed to the rise of activist groups beginning with the civil rights era in the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s college (Nadler, 1971). Being exposed to these types of activist groups helped to shape their thought processes which are shown in the workplace. Baby Boomers represent about 29% which equates to 44.6 million of America’s workforce (Fry, 2015). Technology is understood more by this generation as they bring such skills as critical thinking and problem solving to the workforce. Baby Boomers are well established and career-oriented individuals and bring the mindset of being collaborative, mobile (willing to change locations for their careers), committed, hard workers (can be viewed as over achievers as they work long days), active team member, optimistic, and being continuous learners (Wiedmer, 2015). Moral development is consistent with the Veteran generation as Baby Boomers want to work together to achieve the goals of the organization. Don’t count the Baby Boomers out yet as they still have a lot to offer to the workplace.


Clark, K. R. (2017). Managing Multiple Generations in the Workplace. Radiologic            Technology88(4), 379-398
Fry R. (2015). Millennials surpass Gen Xers as the largest generation in U.S. labor force. Pew
Research Center website. http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/05/11/ millennials-surpass-gen-xers-as-the-largest-generation-in- u-s-labor-force. Published May 11, 2015
Nadler, D. (1971). The NOW employee. Houston: Gulf Publishing Company
Wiedmer T. (2015).  Generations do differ: best practices in leading traditionalists, boomers, and

generations X, Y, and Z. Delta Kappa Gamma Bull. 2015;82(1):51-58

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Working with multiple generations in the workplace: Veterans

The Veterans generation is not one that is discussed as much because many of them have retired. This generation holds individuals who have possibly built businesses and have since passed them on and may occasionally serve on the board. The Veteran generation also known as the Traditionalists or the Silent Generation Schullery, (2013), survived major events that influenced their cultural and societal views such as the Great Depression, World War II, Pearl Harbor, D-Day, the Korean War, the Golden Age of Radio, and the Rise and Creation of labor unions (Clark, 2017). This generation may volunteer at local nonprofits or may work part-time to make their time pass. The Veteran generation was born before 1946 and as of 2017, 55 million Americans are classified as being a part of the Veteran generation (Wiedmer, 2015). As more veterans are choosing to stay busy by continuing to work or volunteer, many have retired. Veterans are comprised of 2% of the U.S. workforce today which equates to 3.7 million employed in some form of work (Fry, 2015). Due to the time in which they were born they weren’t privy the advances in technology offered today. They had to learn to be resourceful, stretch funds, and make do with what they had. Due to having to overcome so many hardships, this generation brings the mindset of being a team player, pride, and determination, loyalty, integrity, respect, character, and sacrifice (Wiedmer, 2015). Many may consider working with a Veteran as a privilege and an opportunity because of the abundance of knowledge they have gained from their life experiences. This generation brings a dynamic and unique mix to the workforce as they are the eldest and may be considered the wisest. Working with the Veteran generation can serve as an honor and a privilege.

Clark, K. R. (2017). Managing Multiple Generations in the Workplace. Radiologic    

Technology, 88(4), 379-398

Schullery, N. M. (2013). Workplace Engagement and Generational Differences in    
Values. Business Communication Quarterly, 76(2), 252-265    
doi:10.1177/1080569913476543
Wiedmer T. (2015). Generations do differ: best practices in leading traditionalists, boomers, and
generations X, Y, and Z. Delta Kappa Gamma Bull. 2015;82(1):51-58

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

The End

We are 6 days (if you count the 26th) away from the new year. We are nearing the end of yet another great year of ups and downs and highs and lows. What did you accomplish? What are you proud of? List out as many great things you did this year. Don’t focus on the negative things (who cares about those). Keep this list close and use it as a measuring guide to what great things you will accomplish next year. Finish this year and prepare to create the next year. I can’t wait to read what you have done.

 

#TheEnd #TruthSpeaks #Learn #TeachTrainEducate

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Peace

Here is a question you should ask yourself daily: Am I at peace in my career? You should first define what is “peace” for yourself.  As I mentioned, you create your own world, therefore you create your own career. If what you are doing each is driving you insane it may be time to evaluate your peace level. Here are some questions you can ask yourself:

 

1.     Am I stressed to the point to where I don’t have a life?

2.     Do I cry about going to work (literally cry)?

3.     Do I hate the people I work with?

4.     Do I ask myself why am I doing this job three times a day or more?

 

These are just a few questions to start you off with evaluating your peace level. Make the changes today because nothing beats having peace in all areas of our lives.

 

#Peace #TruthSpeaks #Learn #TeachTrainEducate

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

While You Are Waiting

Are you waiting on a new job, a promotion, a raise, a big break, an approval for a proposal, or your soulmate? Regardless of what you are waiting on, what you do with your time is what matters. It is apparent you have already made the big step to achieve one of your accomplishments, now you are playing (what some people) call the “waiting game.” How are you spending your time? Do not watch the clock. Keep the ball moving. If you are waiting for a proposal, start writing another one, if you are waiting for a job offer, keep applying for others. The point is to keep it moving (my motivational phrase K.I.M.). It helps to always have a “closing the deal” mindset, not a "sit, wait, and worry” mindset. What are you doing while you are waiting?

#Waiting #TruthSpeaks #Learn #TeachTrainEducate

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Feedback is not personal

Recently, I was given feedback and it didn’t feel very good to hear even though it was delivered professionally. I agreed with the feedback and I am going to adhere to it. I define feedback as opinionated information delivered based on one’s view of another’s performance or actions. Feedback can be positive and constructive but should never be considered negative, because is it geared to aid individuals to become better and propose areas of improvement. Feedback is needed for growth and development not only in life but in your career. I recommend to take feedback seriously but not personally, trust the person who delivers the feedback to have your best interest in mind, and simply act. A rule of thumb is if more than one person delivers the same feedback especially at different times in your life or career, take heed to it and make the necessary changes. Other people see things in us that we can’t see.

 

#Feedback #TruthSpeaks #Learn #TeachTrainEducate